JR's DRIFTER 800 RE-BUILD & RESTORATION - Page 5

- courtesy of JRillustration.com

All contents ©JR Illustration 2005

Cylinders, Cam Chain Tensioners & Mystery Holes

mods/enginere/

I realized that I needed to install the cam chain tensioner guides before moving forward, and I wanted to do that AFTER cylinder installation. So, I installed the cylinders.

I carefully cleaned the mating surfaces of the cylinders and the top of the crankcase, being careful not to drop anything down into the crankcase. Then I carefully laid the gasket in place, and wiped down the inside of the cylinder bore with a clean, lint free cloth, and oiled it down with engine oil.

The cylinders look sort of identical, but you can tell which goes where by the location of the cam chain tensioner bolt in the side of the cylinder casting. It's always on the rear surface, relative to the engine.

 

mods/enginere/
mods/enginere/

Next I arranged the piston ring gaps into their proper positions. The two main rings are 180 degrees out from each other, front and back, and the oil rings are thirty degrees out from the top ring, to either side, and 60 degrees out from each other. After they were in position, I oiled down the sides of the piston, and the rings.

Installing the cylinder was easier than I expected. I had a ring compressor, but I couldn't figure out how I'd be pulling it out after getting the piston in. Instead, I carefully lowered the cylinder down onto the piston, and compressed the rings one at a time with my fingers as they reached the bore. It took some patience, but it wasn't really difficult, and the second cylinder went just as easily as the first.

mods/enginere/
mods/enginere/
mods/enginere/
mods/enginere/
5
5
5
mods/enginere/

The cam chain tensioner guides were a snap. They slid down into the cam chain tunnels on either side of the crankcase, and fastened with two 6mm bolts, treated with nonpermanent threadlocking compound and torqued to 95 inch pounds. (I'm only showing the left side here, but the right was done also, and was just as straightforward.

I also tied the ends of the camchains up to protrusions on the outside of the case, to keep them from dropping back into the tunnels. They were constantly drooping, then dropping back in.

Note: For my project, the camshaft/camchain hardware for the two cylinders was kept separate, in plastic ziplock bags. This was great because it's important to use the same stuff in the same place when you're reassembling used parts. To figure out which bag had what stuff, I looked at the collar behind the gear on the cam. The one that had a groove that ran all the way around it was the rear cam, and the parts with it were for the rear cylinder.

mods/enginere/

It was at about this stage that I noticed some un-filled, 6mm bolt holes. There were two of them on the left crankcase half, and one on the right. I did a hard target search through both my Haynes manual, and the factory one. I searched the online listings of all the parts on the Kawasaki site. I pored over each and every piece of equipment for the bike that is listed on that site at least twice.

Finally I asked on the Delphi forum, and got a response from Harpo. His thought was that the holes may be part of the assembly process. I concur. He even found a reference in section 4 of the Kawasaki manual. My manual shows a photo that happens to include one of the holes, and it is empty. That settled it for me. Case closed. I'm not worrying about the mystery holes any more.

If a bracket and some 6mm bolts show up as extra parts when I'm done, I'll cuss and stomp, then calm down then get back in there to install them.

mods/enginere/
     

CLICK HERE FOR PAGE 6 - Clutch

 

© Saftek Inc. 2012
Not affiliated with Kawaski. Kawasaki, Vulcan and Drifter are trademarks of Kawasaki.